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Supernovae in the Orion: the missing link in the star forming history of the region

Presentation #114.02 in the session “High-mass Star Formation”.

Published onJan 11, 2021
Supernovae in the Orion: the missing link in the star forming history of the region

The Orion Complex is a notable star forming region, that it is fragmented into several different populations that have substantial difference in their phase space. I propose a model that attempts to explain the how the Complex has evolved to this current configuration. In this model, the large scale expansion can be attributable to a supernova that has exploded 6 Myr ago. The remnant of which can be seen as the Barnard’s loop, as the center of the expansion is consistent with the geometrical center of the HII bubble. This is similar to the HII bubble and the ballistic expansion that is associated with lambda Ori, a region which has also been a site to an ancient supernova. Assuming that the Orion Complex has originally been forming as one long filament spanning from the bottom of Orion A to lambda Ori, the Barnard’s loop supernova could have split the cloud, which have lead to the formation of the Orion C & D. Furthermore, the shockwave that has propagated into the filament could have swept along the gas though several pc, which have lead to the formation of the singularly most massive cluster in the Solar Neighborhood, the ONC.


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