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Exploring a Means to Eradicate Intrusion of Artificial Satellite Noise from Astronomical Observational Data

Presentation #132.04 in the session “Computation, Data Handling, Image Analysis”.

Published onJun 18, 2021
Exploring a Means to Eradicate Intrusion of Artificial Satellite Noise from Astronomical Observational Data

There exists more to discover in the natural Universe than thought devoted to explore it. And so, a pristine palette through which to explore both known and unknown phenomenon will always be ideal. It prevents influence from artificial influence and noise. It ensures pure data from which to extrapolate. Where artificial variables intrude, data may be lost. Consequently, understanding that the real may not always be ideal, efforts (or the exploration of their potential) arise to minimize artificial influence on astronomical observations and studies. Additionally, where artificial influence still manifests and strives to pervade, a sub-discipline exists that combines astronomy with computer science and analytics to mitigate the artificial influence. Since the world observed the solar reflection of the first 60-set of Starlink satellites across the night sky in May 2019, the astronomical community has explored efforts to mitigate the satellites’ solar reflectivity (in cooperation with Starlinks’ SpaceX) and minimize the effects of the “streaks” on observational data. And, in fact, these efforts can produce insightful information about both the artificial and natural phenomenon. Using limited DECam images and their intrinsic data, this presentation presents an initial exploration of data related to the contrast between natural objects identified in the images and the – at times – more pronounced artificial objects masquerading as natural. The intent will be to build upon this foundational analysis and progress toward a more robust ability to effectuate surgical elimination of satellite solar reflection from observation data.


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