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What Causes Faint Solar Coronal Jets From Emerging Flux Regions In Coronal Holes?

Presentation #213.14 in the session “Solar Physics Division (SPD): Analysis Techniques and CMEs and Jets”.

Published onJun 18, 2021
What Causes Faint Solar Coronal Jets From Emerging Flux Regions In Coronal Holes?

Using EUV images and line-of-sight magnetograms from Solar Dynamics Observatory, we examine eight emerging bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs) in central-disk coronal holes for whether the emerging magnetic arch made any noticeable coronal jets directly, via reconnection with ambient open field as modeled by Yokoyama & Shibata (1995). During emergence, each BMR produced no obvious EUV coronal jet of normal brightness, but each produced one or more faint EUV coronal jets that are discernible in AIA 193 Å images. The spires of these jets are much fainter and usually narrower than for typical EUV jets that have been observed to be produced by minifilament eruptions in quiet regions and coronal holes. For each of 26 faint jets from the eight emerging BMRs, we examine whether the faint spire was evidently made a la Yokoyama & Shibata (1995). We find: (1) 16 of these faint spires evidently originate from sites of converging opposite-polarity magnetic flux and show base brightenings like those in minifilament-eruption-driven coronal jets, (2) the 10 other faint spires maybe were made by a burst of the external-magnetic-arcade-building reconnection of the emerging magnetic arch with the ambient open field, reconnection directly driven by the arch’s emergence, but (3) none were unambiguously made by such emergence-driven reconnection. Thus, for these eight emerging BMRs, the observations indicate that emergence-driven external reconnection of the emerging magnetic arch with ambient open field at most produces a jet spire that is much fainter than in previously-reported, much more obvious coronal jets driven by minifilament eruptions.


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