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Temperature Evolution Of Coronal Flux Observed Through Multiple Extreme Ultraviolet Wavelengths

Presentation #313.17 in the session “Solar Physics Division (SPD): Instrumentation and Active Regions”.

Published onJun 18, 2021
Temperature Evolution Of Coronal Flux Observed Through Multiple Extreme Ultraviolet Wavelengths

Coronal loops are the manifestation of magnetic fields in the solar corona. In the environment of two adjacent active regions (ARs) any flux linkage between the two should be observed as interconnecting loops, if we are to assume each AR is itself its own magnetic system. Therefore, by looking at loops between AR pairs we can quantify magnetic reconnection, the process believed to be behind those loops’ formation. Further, these loops are believed to be impulsively heated during their formation and should therefore be visible at progressively lower temperatures as they cool. This cooling behavior is well known in flares, but would be present in quiescent loops if they are heated impulsively, for example by nanoflares. Here we test this hypothesis by looking for each loop in a quiescent active region to cool through multiple temperatures. In previous work, we created a catalog of coronal loops interconnecting two active regions using AIA images in 171A. We perform our search by looking extending the previous catalog of coronal loops into other EUV wavelengths. Comparisons are presented between the loops in this interconnecting magnetic domain observed at varying wavelengths. We find evidence that some loops have been impulsively heated and appear at progressively cooler temperatures. There are, however, many counter-examples which may challenge the hypothesis of impulsive heating followed by free cooling.


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