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DUDI. Fast code for modeling two-body dynamics of dust ejected from an atmosphereless body

Presentation #308.02 in the session “Active Satellites”.

Published onOct 03, 2021
DUDI. Fast code for modeling two-body dynamics of dust ejected from an atmosphereless body

The ejection of material from the surfaces of atmosphereless bodies is a ubiquitous phenomenon in the Solar System. Prominent examples are ejecta clouds from hypervelocity impacts or plumes from active satellites. For the dynamics of the ejected material, it is in many cases possible to neglect any other forces than the mass point gravity of the source body to a good degree of approximation. We continued work of Krivov et. al 2003, Sremčević et. al 2003 and Postberg et. al 2011 to create a model describing the spatial distribution of dust ejected from the surface of an atmosphereless body (Ershova & Schmidt, 2021). The model allows us to calculate dust number density or related quantities at a relatively close vicinity of the dust source. The number density is derived from a set of distributions describing the process of dust ejection. Computationally heavy integration of dust particles’ trajectories is not required. The formulae that had been derived in the previous works were elaborated to achieve more flexibility in modeling the dust ejection. In our model the ejection can be non-stationary and asymmetrical relative to the surface normal. Furthermore, the number of necessary numerical integrations since the old models was reduced down to only one, which provided us with an opportunity to implement the model as a fast code. The code is written in Fortran-95 language and named DUDI for “Dust Distribution.” It is freely available at https://github.com/Veyza/dudi for the common use. In our iPoster we present the DUDI package, explain the underlying ideas, and show the examples of its usage. Although limited to the cases in which the two-body dynamics is a sufficient approximation, our model has a wide range of possible applications for the research of the bodies in the Solar System. We demonstrate the capabilities of DUDI on the active satellites — Enceladus, Io, and Europa.


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