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Six New Mass Measurements of Transiting Giant Planets on Orbits Longer than 100 Days and Insights into the Empirical Mass-Radius Relationship

Presentation #102.319 in the session Poster Session.

Published onJun 20, 2022
Six New Mass Measurements of Transiting Giant Planets on Orbits Longer than 100 Days and Insights into the Empirical Mass-Radius Relationship

The union of the transit and radial velocity (RV) techniques, each of which measures a key exoplanet observable, has strongly guided the early development of exoplanet science. However, the short-period selection bias of the transit method has left a dearth of well characterized exoplanets at wider separations that limits tests of planetary formation and structure theories. We will discuss results from the ongoing Giant Outer Transiting Exoplanet Mass (GOT'EM) survey, which confronts the transit method’s selection bias by focusing on planets with orbital periods between 100 and 1,000 days. We conducted four years of Doppler spectroscopy at Keck Observatory of five planetary systems originally identified by the Kepler mission to host giant planet candidates. This resulted in precise mass and eccentricity measurements for six giant planets. Our sample represents a substantial contribution of well characterized worlds to a previously sparse region of parameter space. Owing to their orbital distances, these giant planets’ radii are not inflated like those of hot Jupiters. We can therefore combine our mass and radius measurements to gain new insights into the relationship between mass and radius for cool giant planets akin to Jupiter and Saturn.

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