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A Pair of Early- and Late-Forming Galaxy Cluster Samples: Implications for Detection of Halo Assembly Bias

Presentation #202.06 in the session Cosmology — iPoster Session.

Published onJun 29, 2022
A Pair of Early- and Late-Forming Galaxy Cluster Samples: Implications for Detection of Halo Assembly Bias

The halo assembly bias, a phenomenon referring to dependencies of the large-scale bias of a dark matter halo other than its mass, is a fundamental property of our standard cosmological model. First discovered in 2005 via high-resolution numerical simulations, it has been proven very difficult to be detected observationally, with only a few convincing claims of detection thus far. The main obstacle lies in finding an accurate proxy of the halo formation time. In this study, by utilizing a constrained simulation that can faithfully reproduce the observed structures larger than ~2 Mpc in the local universe, for a sample of about 630 massive clusters at z ≤ 0.12, we find their counterpart halos in the simulation and use the mass growth history of the matched halos to estimate the formation time of the observed clusters. This allows us to construct a pair of early- and late-forming clusters, with similar mass as measured via weak gravitational lensing, and large-scale bias differing at ≥4σ level, clearly showing the signature of assembly bias.

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