Skip to main content
SearchLoginLogin or Signup

Using ALMA to Constrain the Structure of the Epsilon Eridani Debris Disk and the Origin of Epsilon Eridani b

Presentation #319.06 in the session Exoplanet Formation of Planets and Protoplanetary Disks I.

Published onJun 29, 2022
Using ALMA to Constrain the Structure of the Epsilon Eridani Debris Disk and the Origin of Epsilon Eridani b

As a result of significant advancements in radio interferometry, namely from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), the substructures of debris disks are now imaged with ultra-high resolution. Debris disks are the final stage of circumstellar disk evolution, and provide a fossil record of the planet formation process through the distribution of remnant dust and planetesimals. If a planet is present in the debris disk, gravitational interactions can perturb the dusty material and produce asymmetric structures. Epsilon Eridani (K2) is the closest Sun-like star (at 3.22 pc) with a planetary system hosting both an inner and outer debris disk along with a roughly Jupiter-mass planet at ~3.5 au (Epsilon Eridani b). We present new mosaic observations from ALMA at 1.3 mm (Band 6) of the outer Epsilon Eridani debris disk. By fitting models directly to the observed ALMA visibilities, we are able to determine the structure of the disk and constrain a potential star-disk misalignment that might shed light on the formation and previous migration of the planet. We also apply Gaussian Processes, a machine learning algorithm for model fitting, to our millimeter emission simulations as an alternative to the commonly used Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach and test its effectiveness for analyzing ALMA visibility data.

Comments
0
comment

No comments here