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Searching for Thermal Emission in X-rays around the Crab Nebula with a Novel Blind Source Separation Method

Presentation #351.10 in the session Planetary Nebulae, Supernova Remnants — iPoster Session.

Published onJun 29, 2022
Searching for Thermal Emission in X-rays around the Crab Nebula with a Novel Blind Source Separation Method

In composite supernova remnants, the pulsar wind nebulae develop in the unshocked ejecta. The expanding pulsar wind can shock the surrounding ejecta and dust that have not been reheated by the reverse shock, providing a heating source for inner supernova ejecta that could help probing its properties. In particular, infrared data show interactions between the pulsar wind nebula and the surrounding ejecta and dust in the Crab, which could possibly be detectable in X-rays.

Thermal emission has never been observed with certainty in X-rays in the Crab nebula. However, most data analysis tools in use in the high energy astrophysics community do not take full advantage of the unprecedented level of details the current generation of spectro-imaging telescopes can offer ; they only focus on the spectral information without using the many spatial specificities or the correlation between the spectral and spatial dimensions. The GMCA, a new blind source separation method relying on the morphological characteristics of the components to retrieve together with their spectral signatures, was proven able to separate faint and highly untangled components with great accuracy and low pollution. First applications of this method on Chandra data have shown promising hints for a detection of a thermal component in X-rays in the Crab nebula. In this talk, we will present the results of the GMCA on both Chandra and XMM-Newton data, and discuss our findings.

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