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Sun-as-a-star spectroscopic observations of the line-of-sight velocity of a solar eruption on October 28, 2021

Presentation #125.08 in the session General Topics: Solar — Poster Session.

Published onOct 20, 2022
Sun-as-a-star spectroscopic observations of the line-of-sight velocity of a solar eruption on October 28, 2021

The propagation direction and true velocity of a solar coronal mass ejection, which are among the most decisive factors for its geo-effectiveness, are difficult to determine through single-perspective imaging observations. Here we show that Sun-as-a-star spectroscopic observations, together with imaging observations, could allow us to solve this problem. Using observations of the Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we found clear blue-shifted secondary emission components in extreme ultraviolet spectral lines during a solar eruption on October 28, 2021. From simultaneous imaging observations, we found that the secondary components are caused by a mass ejection from the flare site. We estimated the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity of the ejecta from both the double Gaussian fitting method and the red-blue asymmetry analysis. The results of both methods agree well with each other, giving an average LOS velocity of the plasma of ~423 km s-1. From the 304 Å image series taken by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager onboard the Solar Terrestrial Relation Observatory-A (STEREO-A) spacecraft, we estimated the plane-of-sky (POS) velocity from the STEREO-A viewpoint to be around 587 km s-1. The full velocity of the bulk motion of the ejecta was then computed by combining the imaging and spectroscopic observations, which turns out to be around 596 km s-1 with an angle of 42.4° to the west of the Sun-Earth line and 16.0° south to the ecliptic plane.

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