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Improving Operational Solar EUV Irradiance Modeling Using Physics-Based Differential Emission Measure Techniques

Presentation #207.02 in the session Solar X-ray and VUV Spectra: Observation, Modeling and Planetary Atmospheric Impacts I.

Published onOct 20, 2022
Improving Operational Solar EUV Irradiance Modeling Using Physics-Based Differential Emission Measure Techniques

Solar Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance incident on Earth’s upper atmosphere varies by a factor of 2 to 10, depending on wavelength, which impacts atmospheric drag experienced by satellites in low-earth orbit. Recent work suggests that solar EUV measurements and models must be accurate to much better than 25% in order to benefit operational satellite collision avoidance (Emmert et al. 2014; Emmert et al. 2017; Vourlidas & Bruinsma, 2018). However, this accuracy is not met by most existing EUV measurements and models including the operational EUV spectral model used by SWPC. We present work from a NASA Operations to Research project to develop a physics-based operational EUV spectral model from 5-127 nm with 1 nm resolution and 1 minute cadence to within 10% relative error. The model will utilize the full suite of operational solar data from the GOES-R satellites by using solar image data from the Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI) to model solar corona emission using physics-based differential emission measures (DEMs) and solar irradiance data from the Extreme Ultraviolet and X-ray Irradiance Sensor (EXIS) to model chromospheric and continuum emission. We present preliminary results using simulated GOES-R data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) which show that the model achieves the proposed 10% relative error at 1 nm spectral resolution across a majority of the 5-127 nm range.

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