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Observations by JunoCam in a limb and terminator settings, and a brief update on ongoing parallax measurements

Presentation #505.08 in the session Origin and Evolution of Giant Planet Systems I (Oral Presentation)

Published onOct 23, 2023
Observations by JunoCam in a limb and terminator settings, and a brief update on ongoing parallax measurements

Changing observational conditions

JunoCam, the wide-angle visible light imager onboard NASA’s Juno spacecraft, has taken close-up images of Jupiter’s night side, just beyond the terminator. On the one hand, this drift of Jupiter’s night side underneath the perijove of Juno’s orbit provides us with less close-up images of Jupiter’s dayside. On the other hand we receive the opportunity to observe Jupiter’s terminator close-up.

Haze observations where the terminator intersects with the limb

Especially the view to the limb portion of the terminator provides us with new opportunities to observe Jupiter’s high-altitude hazes. Especially detached hazes show up in a specific way. Long image exposure enhances this kind of data collection.

Energetic particles

Large areas imaged on the night side with a high TDI parameter, essentially meaning a long exposure, makes us looking at the energetic particle hits not just as noise but as data changing hugely during the perijove pass. These energetic particle data compete with the much rarer lightning observations and possibly with illuminated tips of cloud towers.

Update on cloud-top parallax

Besides these more recent observations, a brief update on parallax measurements of cloud tops in pairs of JunoCam images will be included, especially in the context of the goal to calibrate methane-band images in terms of relative cloud-top elevation.

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