Skip to main content
SearchLoginLogin or Signup

Uncovering the Obliquity Distribution of Hot Stars with Massive Hot Jupiters and Brown Dwarfs

Presentation #606.06 in the session Stellar Spins and Obliquities.

Published onApr 03, 2024
Uncovering the Obliquity Distribution of Hot Stars with Massive Hot Jupiters and Brown Dwarfs

Hot stars are known to have spin axes that are frequently misaligned with the orbital axes of their hot Jupiters. These high “stellar obliquities” are thought to be a consequence of either (1) dynamical interactions between the planets and massive outer companions, or (2) primordial misalignments between the stars and their protostellar disks. While these mechanisms can produce similar outcomes, they differ in one important way: the former has a dependence on the planet mass (or, more precisely, the mass ratio between the inner planet and its hypothetical outer companion), whereas the latter does not. Currently, the vast majority of hot Jupiters with these measurements are low in mass, largely because transiting super-Jovian-mass planets and brown dwarfs are rare, causing them to be found primarily around faint stars that make challenging targets for most ground-based telescopes. This selection bias has made it difficult to disentangle these two processes, greatly limiting our understanding of hot Jupiter formation. To gain new insight, we are undertaking a survey to measure the obliquities of hot stars with massive transiting companions using the Keck Planet Finder spectrograph. We present early findings from this survey, including a stellar obliquity measurement of the GPX-1 system, which contains an early F-type star and a transiting 20 Jupiter mass brown dwarf. In addition, we discuss our plans for the survey moving forward and detail our ability to build up a statistically meaningful sample of these systems.

Comments
0
comment
No comments here