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A Spatially Resolved Study of Galactic Outflows in a Gravitationally Lensed Galaxy

Published onJun 01, 2020
A Spatially Resolved Study of Galactic Outflows in a Gravitationally Lensed Galaxy

Galactic outflows play an important role in galaxy evolution by regulating the star formation process and transporting metals from the galaxies into the intergalactic medium. Understanding these outflows will help to build better models for galaxy evolution. Previous studies have used long slit spectrographs to study the galaxies as a whole. This method yields average global properties of outflows in galaxies. In this work, we use the MUSE integral field unit spectrograph to study the outflows in a gravitationally lensed star-forming galaxy at z = 1.7. Gravitational Lensing magnifies a galaxy and stretches it out on the sky, providing higher S/N spectra and higher spatial resolution than unlensed galaxies. In this work, we test if the outflow properties depend on properties of local individual star-forming regions of the galaxy, or if they are a global phenomenon depending only on the average properties of the galaxy. We use the Mg II and Fe II emission and absorption lines as tracers of the cool entrained gas in the outflows. By studying these lines, we find out that outflows velocities depend on the properties of local individual star-forming knots. By mapping the outflows using Mg II emission, we see that the outflows are spatially extended compared to the stellar continuum.

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